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Herb Garden Essentials – How ...

Herbs not only add a special touch of flavor to our favorite dishes, they also bring with them a host of health benefits. There is, then, no wonder wh...

broccoli

Guide to a Spring Garden – Wh...

Start Your Healthy Diet Today With Fresh Vegetables From A Spring Garden If you have made your New Year's resolution to get healthy this year, than...

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Summer Planting Guide – What ...

Once you've harvested some of your Spring planting, you'll be looking forward to Summer and deciding what will be the next crop you'll be planting in ...

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Top 5 Natural Pesticides for Your G...

Here we look at alternatives to harsh chemicals that stay in your food and leach into the soils. 1. Ladybugs Ladybugs are most common of all benefic...

Long Term Water Storage Do’s and Don’ts

waterstorageIf you have chosen to make your living environment a so-called “Green environment”, chances are you have invested in relying upon solar energy and wind energy. That being said, preparedness and accountability for natural resources such as water can be a positive contribution to your green environment as well as your chances at effective survival in the instance of a disaster. Green living calls for self-sufficiency, therefore, long term water storage is a worthwhile investment. Read more →

Herb Garden Essentials – How and When Herbs Grow Best

SONY DSCHerbs not only add a special touch of flavor to our favorite dishes, they also bring with them a host of health benefits. There is, then, no wonder why many wish to have a constant supply of herbs readily available. Growing your own herbs is often much easier than most people think, and is a cost effective approach to fresh herbs. Here, we highlight a few herbs which grow well throughout much of the United States.

Basil. This spicy herb is used in lots of Italian dishes and in Italian pesto. Other uses include soups, salads and as a basis for a number of sauces. Basil grows both indoors and outdoors and can be grown year-round. It thrives in tropical environments and is best grown outdoors if planted after the last frost in springtime. Those desiring to grow basil indoors must be careful to provide enough lighting (at least six hours or more per day) and water. Read more →

Free Food: Wild Edible Plants from Your Backyard

frernMemo to survival and foraging enthusiasts: many wild edible plants that have been dismissed as ‘weeds’ are actually powerhouses of vitamins, minerals and protein. For those of you who don’t use lawn-care or garden chemicals on your yards, Mother Nature has a special reward for you: free food!

 

Here’s your personal ‘field guide’ to identifying and preparing plants commonly found in many yards: Read more →

Basic Canning for Food Storage

canning2Vegetables and fruits have always been good foods for canning, easily grown in a backyard gardening and easy to manipulate and pack in a home-canning food preservation process. However, the harder part is learning all the necessary steps involved in canning so that the food is preserved, it doesn’t spoil, and can be easily stored. Read more →

Guide to a Spring Garden – What to Plant and When

broccoliStart Your Healthy Diet Today With Fresh Vegetables From A Spring Garden

If you have made your New Year’s resolution to get healthy this year, than you can start by introducing more fresh vegetables in your diet. But you don’t need to make a grocery list of the vegetables you plan to buy. With a little time and gardening space, you can have fresh vegetables right from your own spring garden. Read more →

Summer Planting Guide – What to Plant and When

SONY DSCOnce you’ve harvested some of your Spring planting, you’ll be looking forward to Summer and deciding what will be the next crop you’ll be planting in your garden. There are a wide variety of vegetables and herbs that will flourish during the Summer months, even though the temperatures will be at their hottest. However, when you do the harvest in the Fall, you’ll definitely appreciate all the effort and sweat.

For instance, you’ll want to plant seeds or transplant seedlings for many vegetables. The list includes many varieties of beans, beets, tomatoes, corn, potatoes, squash and cucumber in early Summer such as early to mid-June. Read more →

Backyard Chicken Basics

135298_9101Have People Gone Crazy, or Are They Just Getting Smarter?

Backyard chickens in a homemade chicken coop are springing up in many backyards. Raising chickens for the benefit of an excellent food source for eggs and meat and is one of the easiest and cost worthy things to do. Backyard chickens will also help to keep the bug population down in the backyard. No more chemicals in the backyard as long as the chickens are there. Read more →

Go off the Grid: Renewable Energy Options for Your Home

1036496_40453089In today’s world, not only are people looking for ways to have a positive impact on the environment but they’re looking for more affordable ways to do it as well. Taking advantage of ways to use renewable energy resources instead of being a slave to the local power company is definitely a step in the right direction. If self sufficiency is your goal then taking a hard look at solar energy or wind energy is definitely in your future. Read more →

Top 5 Natural Pesticides for Your Garden

ladybugHere we look at alternatives to harsh chemicals that stay in your food and leach into the soils.

1. Ladybugs

Ladybugs are most common of all beneficial insects, these voracious predators feed on aphids, chinch bugs, asparagus beetle larvae, thrips, alfalfa weevils, bean thrips, grape root worms, Colorado potato beetle larvae, whitefly, and mites, as well as many other soft-bodied insects and eggs. Not only do I love Ladybugs but they are also an extremely cost effective way to get rid of many damaging insects that are in your yard and causing damage to your garden and vegetables. Read more →

The Case for Composting

compostWhy Compost?
Over time, garden soil can lose its nutrients; especially if decomposing plants aren’t returned to the earth as usually happens in the wild. Composting supplements the soil naturally, providing those missing nutrients. Best of all, its free and environmentally friendly. Read more →